Quantum Algorithms
Tuesday, February 15, 2005
 
Blog Market
My collection of links on the right isn't very complete, but I had no idea how much was riding on it until I discovered Blog Shares, a stock market for blogs. Someone named Javier López actually owns 75% of the shares of this very blog, although I'm sure he'll eventually regret the purchase if he doesn't already. David Bacon own 20% of his own Quantum Pontiff blog, which is about to experience a modest increase in (virtual) valuation, thanks to the extremely overdue link I finally added. I wonder if blogshare money will ever have real world value. (If it sounds implausible, see EverQuest).

Some quantum or CS type blogs, and their valuations [Updated Feb-16, thanks Suresh]:
Computational Complexity Web Log: $12,029.76
Michael Nielson: $5,845.59
The Quantum Pontiff: $3,849.21
Quantum Algorithms: $3,816.68
Illuminating Science: $3,313.81
Quantum Bits: $2,709.12
Quantized Espresso: $1,664.65
Comments:
lance changed his blog URL. if you go to blogshares and look for the old URL, you will find an appropriately higher valuation (roughly $12000)
 
Hey. Since you run a quantum algorithms blog, I was wondering if you could take some time to explain - in layman's turns - how quantum algorithms work.

As I understand it, a quantum computer is able to test many cases in parallel... and I have heard that this leads to NP and possibly harder problems being easily solved in polynomial time.

Is this a misunderstanding on my part? Wouldn't this show that P = NP (I can accept that maybe it can be true without showing this, if it can be explained)?

How does it work?
 
I meant to add that I actually found you through Blogshares :D
 
More... (sorry)...
given that the way Blogshare calculates the value of a blog is ostensibly similar to Google's PageRankings, Blogshare valuations are already quite valuable in practice - through coveted high Google links.
In practice I am not sure how similar Google's and Blogshare's rankings are, but they are somewhat related by algorithm.
 
"I have heard that this leads to NP and possibly harder problems being easily solved in polynomial time."Algorithms have been developed that can solve certain NP problems in polynomial time on a quantum computer, but no one has come up with a quantum algorithm solving an NP-complete problem in polynomial time, and it remains an open question if it's possible or not.

"Wouldn't this show that P = NP"No...the class of problems that a quantum computer can solve in polynomial time is called "BQP": bounded error, quantum, polynomial time. So even if you showed that BQP = NP, it still would not imply that P = NP. However, if you proved that QBP != NP, then that would imply P != NP, since BQP contains P.

Take a look at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computer
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BQP
http://www.cs.caltech.edu/~westside/quantum-intro.html
 
Thanks for the info :)
 
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Destiny Matrixquantum physics and politics
http://destinymatrix.blogspot.com/
 
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